Phil Wade’s Course Skeleton

Standard

I always have trouble with lesson planning to the grand scheme of things. I’m still not sure why no-one goes into depth about planning to a syllabus, with reference to the core curriculum. I’m trying to get away from coursebooks, whilst learning some E2 + grammar myself. The list is exhaustive, and using this method has actually helped me to de-stress a little.

Language Moments

Course skeletons I love using Dale’s skeleton idea for classes because it lets you create or adapt a basic lesson format which can be used, reused, adapted for different levels, topics, learners etc. This ‘bare bones’ approach also lets you ad on anything in your ‘teacher toolkit’ as it is referred to a lot nowadays.

While, this approach seems great for one-off or general classes, the question of (as with much Dogme-related work) how well will it work in formal/academic situations is another matter. Well, being an ‘all or nothing’ kind of guy I have jumped feet first into this predicament with Scott Thornbury and Luke Meddings under one arm, well a copy of their Teaching Unplugged, an assortment of board pens and paper in the other. Trial and error, hit and miss, pass and fail. I’ve probably experienced all of them but now that I’m planning another lengthy uni-level…

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